Types of Gifts

Philanthropy has the power to shape worlds. Whether it's promoting the discovery of cures through the support of ground-breaking research or helping a single student achieve their dream of a college degree, giving to Florida State changes lives.

campus1samplesize.jpg

Gifts to the College can be annual, endowed or planned, and private support is essential to ensure that Florida State University students, faculty and programs have the resources they need to make a difference.

 

 

Annual Giving

Annual Giving is often called the foundation of support for a university. Annual gifts are used in the current operating budget and provide crucial support. Donors can choose to have their gifts be unrestricted -- meaning they will be used where they are most needed -- or designated to a specific college, program, or unit that is personally meaningful to them. A gift to the Annual Fund not only assists in the high quality education for future generations of Seminoles, but alumni participation has a direct impact on the University's national rankings. These rankings allow the University to continue to attract the best and the brightest students, and enhance the value and prestige of a degree received at Florida State.

  • Many employers have a matching gift program that could double or triple your contribution. To find out if your company participates in a matching gift program, visit matchinggifts.com/fsu or ask your human resources department.

Find out more »

Endowed Gifts

While all gifts to FSU enhance its high quality of education, research and discovery, endowments are especially important. Endowed gifts are invested and managed by the University in perpetuity. A portion of the investment earnings is spent while the original gifts are preserved as principal. In this way, endowed gifts have greater earning power -- a one-time gift that lasts forever.

The investment made in Florida State with the establishment of an endowment provides a critical source of funding to support scholarships, fellowships, professorships, lecture series, programs, research and more; year after year. Florida State University has established the endowment funding minimum of $25,000. (These can be broken into payments over five years at $5,000 per year.) Depending on the objective and the type of gift, higher amounts may be necessary to achieve the desired outcome. 

  • Endowments can also be named in honor of the donor, their business, or another individual.

Find more out »

Gift Planning

Florida State University's next century of success depends on planned giving today. Planned gifts cover a wide range of options -- from including Florida State as a beneficiary in your will or your retirement account, to creating a trust or charitable gift annuity -- just to name a few.

A planned gift enables donors to assist FSU in its long-term mission of student learning, innovative research and community engagement while helping to reduce a donor's burden of income, capital gains, or estate taxes. Not only do planned gifts benefit the donor and donor's family, they provide the resources to create extraordinary opportunities for students and faculty, and preserve Florida State's legacy for future generations.

  • You can also donate tangible personal property, such as artwork or antique furnishings.

With these planned gifts, you may:

  • Receive fixed payments for life, enjoy tax benefits, and ensure success for future generations of FSU students and alumni.

Find out more »

Corporate & Foundation Gifts

The Florida State University Foundation works closely with corporate and foundation representatives to ensure that top University priorities are achieved. Our team cultivates mutually beneficial relationships with corporations and foundations to fund programs and services as well transformational scholarships and professorships.

Find out more »

Real Estate

Whether it’s your home, undeveloped land or commercial property, an outright or deferred gift of real estate can be used to support your favorite college or program at Florida State.

Find out more »